María Berrío: A Day’s Cadence

    7 July–8 August 2020

    ‘These works ask the question: do we control and shape the world or does it control and shape us? For me, the answers are to be found in our children.’ — María Berrío

    The exhibition A Day’s Cadence makes audible the silence that follows in the wake of a catastrophe, a solemnity that points as much towards modes of resilience and adaptation as it does to the crushing devastation of loss. This theme takes shape through María Berrío’s narration of a small fishing village that has undergone a tragedy. In these works, Berrío explores how the formation of historical memory occurs amidst processes of grieving in a village that maps the site of her own imagination. 

    Berrío began this series, originally conceived as large-scale paintings depicting the barren homes and landscapes that situate the women and children left behind after the catastrophe, on the eve of the new decade. As the coronavirus pandemic emerged and threw 2020 into tumult, the lines demarcating her imaginary village from the reality in which she lived seemed to smudge and blur before her eyes. Though external circumstances may have shifted, however, her drive to create art – to respond to the world, to push back against the prevailing fear and anxiety – endures. Unable to keep up her studio practice and continue the large scale works that had heretofore comprised the series, Berrío began a number of smaller pieces at home, focusing on portraits of the village’s children. The scale and detail of the portraits reflects the conditions of their production during an extended period of global quarantine.

    The exhibition is also available to view via the App Store on Vortic Collect

    Last year Victoria Miro established a studio space in Venice for invited artists to spend extended time in the historic city and make new bodies of work. During a recent two-month residency, Flora Yukhnovich used the opportunity to engage more fully with Venetian culture. Her sources include the music of Vivaldi and the memoirs of Casanova, in addition to one of her key influences, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, whose works including ceiling frescos in the Ca’ Rezzonico museum and the Chiesa Santa Maria della Visitazione she was able to study first hand to create this new suite of paintings for this exhibition.

    Flora Yukhnovich: The Venice Paintings is presented by Victoria Miro in association with Parafin and is available to view both here and via the App Store on Vortic Collect.


    1

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    76.2 x 61 cm
    30 x 24 in

    María Berrío, Under a Cold Sun, 2020

    ‘In the words of Pablo Neruda, “You can cut all the flowers, but you cannot keep Spring from coming”.’— María Berrío

    As inhabitants of the village Berrío has been creating, these children offer another lens onto the themes that the village conjures. While they, too, are subject to the knife-edge of grief, they also breathe new life onto the embers of hope, the promise of growth forestalled but not forgotten.

    María Berrío’s studio, June 2020

    2

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    50.8 x 40.6 cm
    20 x 16 in

    María Berrío, Malady of the Infinite, 2020

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    50.8 x 40.6 cm
    20 x 16 in

    María Berrío, Before the Days Have Left Their Mark, 2020

    ‘Windows feature prominently in one group of paintings, but their vantages onto the outside are obscured by ominous clouds.’ — María Berrío

    María Berrío’s studio, June 2020

    3

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    76.2 x 61 cm
    30 x 24 in

    María Berrío, The Combed Thunderclap, 2020

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    50.8 x 40.6 cm
    20 x 16 in

    María Berrío, The Spike of the Crocus, 2020

    ‘Nature’s fecundity presses impatiently on these images.’ — María Berrío

    In other works, flowers herald the presence of a living world just outside of the frame. As the artist says, ‘Nature’s fecundity presses impatiently on these images.’


    5

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    50.8 x 40.6 cm
    20 x 16 in

    María Berrío, Interior of a Moment, 2020

    María Berrío’s studio, June 2020

    6

    Collage with Japanese paper and watercolour paint on canvas
    76.2 x 61 cm
    30 x 24 in

    María Berrío, Baz, 2020

    ‘As the old world is uprooted, it is the seedlings that will sprout and eventually flourish in the overturned soil.’ — María Berrío.

    The final portrait shows the artist’s own son, whose presence refutes the pull of the imaginary while at the same time underscoring its potency, reality and fantasy emerging out of one another. Has Berrío’s life enfolded her fiction or is it the other way around? The question strikes urgently: do we control and shape the world or does it control and shape us? For Berrío, the answers to this question are to be found in our children. As the artist comments, ‘In the words of Pablo Neruda, “You can cut all the flowers, but you cannot keep Spring from coming.” As the old world is uprooted, it is the seedlings that will sprout and eventually flourish in the overturned soil.’


    María Berrío

    About the artist

    Photo © Kyle Dorosz

    Based in Brooklyn, María Berrío was born and grew up in Colombia. Her works, which are meticulously crafted from layers of Japanese paper, reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history.

    María Berrío’s work is in permanent collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, USA; National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, USA; Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, USA; Pérez Art Museum, Miami, USA and Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, USA, among others. Her work has been shown as part of significant exhibitions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, USA; Nasher Museum of Art, USA; Prospect.4 Triennial, New Orleans; and the Museo del Barrio, New York. The Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, is organising the first survey of Berrío’s work, scheduled to open in early 2021.

     


    Vortic Installation

    XR installation view, María Berrío, A Day’s Cadence, Victoria Miro on Vortic, 7 July–8 August 2020. All works © María Berrío, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro

    XR installation view, María Berrío, A Day’s Cadence, Victoria Miro on Vortic, 7 July–8 August 2020. All works © María Berrío, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro

    XR installation view, María Berrío, A Day’s Cadence, Victoria Miro on Vortic, 7 July–8 August 2020. All works © María Berrío, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro

    XR installation view, María Berrío, A Day’s Cadence, Victoria Miro on Vortic, 7 July–8 August 2020. All works © María Berrío, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro

    XR installation view, María Berrío, A Day’s Cadence, Victoria Miro on Vortic, 7 July–8 August 2020. All works © María Berrío, courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro

    Victoria Miro worked with the virtual art platform Vortic to capture these works – as well as their physical gallery spaces in London – photogrammetrically with the latest high-resolution 3D scanning technology.

    Vortic’s software and rendering techniques, which have never before been used in the industry, enable Victoria Miro to present exhibitions of 2D and 3D works in the very highest quality. These works can be experienced in Virtual Reality via the Vortic Collect app.

    Learn more about Vortic here.

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